Fatemeh Keshavarz —
The Ecstatic Faith of Rumi

The 13th-century Muslim mystic and poet Rumi has long shaped Muslims around the world and has now become popular in the West. Rumi created a new language of love within the Islamic mystical tradition of Sufism. We hear his poetry as we delve into his world and listen for its echoes in our own.

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Guests

Keshavarz is professor of Persian & Comparative Literature at Washington University in St. Louis, and the author of several books, including Reading Mystical Lyric: The Case of Jalal aI-Din Rumi.

Pertinent Posts

1

As if Morocco and the Fes Festival of World Sacred Music weren't enchanting enough. A guest contribution with video by Hussein Rashid on the magical intimacy of Sufi Nights.

SoundSeen (our multimedia stories)

The Musicality of Rumi

View the Liän Ensemble with Fatemeh Keshavarz put the poetry of Rumi to music in this January 27, 2007 performance at a Stanford University event celebrating Rumi's 800th birthday.

Selected Poems

Selected Poems from Rumi, in Persian and in English

To some, Rumi's poetry is best heard aloud; to others, Rumi's words should be experienced in silent reading. Here, we present the text of seven poems and readings of those poems in Persian and in English, with male and female voices.

Song of the Reed

Translated by Coleman Barks

The Promise

Translation from Rumi's Divan by Fatemeh Keshavarz

Like This

Translation from Rumi's Divan by Fatemeh Keshavarz

On God

Translation from Discourses of Rumi by Fatemeh Keshavarz

On Language

Translation from Rumi's Masnavi by Fatemeh Keshavarz

On the World

translation from Discourses of Rumi by Fatemeh Keshavarz

On Love

Translation from Discourses of Rumi by Fatemeh Keshavarz

First Person

Inspired By Rumi

We asked for your stories about Rumi and the appeal of his poetry. Read fellow listeners' memories. We'd like to hear yours as well.

Kelli Koning Julie Hursey David Mendelsohn Kevin Sparks
Mary Lynn White Bob Wells Roberta Kilstrom Melody Doering
James Farrelly Meg Gatza Catherine Jones Arlene Ducao

Selected Audio

Additional Unheard Cuts: Rumi

Includes: "Sufism and the Whirling Dervishes", "Pregnant with God", and "The Eccentricity of Shams".

About the Image

A young man from Islamabad, Pakistan expresses himself through photography and the poetry of Rumi.

Episode Sponsor

Funding provided in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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28Reflections

Reflections

Rumi speaks to me in words that I have never heard before, but of places that I know well. I am profoundly grateful for his depth of clarity, as well as his Islamic faith. While this faith provides the stage for his penetrating perspectives, it does not overshadow the true object of his adoration.

As a life-long member of the LDS religion, I find solace in Rumi's ability to walk a well traveled road, not as follower, but as an original participant in the journey. It is this intimate association with the sacred path that makes him a trustworthy guide, any of his perceived deviations from the narrow way not easily written-off as sacrilege. Each footstep Rumi takes, on or off the main route, is a call for one to wonder about where his position lies in relation to the divine.

Though I often feel fettered by the cumbersome aspects of my faith, I fail to recognize that the fetters are my own. Rumi illustrates that a profound fluency in one's language of spiritual heritage is not a burden, but a gift. Once one's spiritual journey leaps from the the minaret into the transcendent, one may chart their course by previously unseen stars.

In this way Rumi enters and leaves the strait way with grace and creativity, causing one to wonder about the geometry that undergirds his movements.

Rumi knew God.
When I read his works, I know God too.
Rumi knew what it means to be fully human.
When I read his works, I am fully human too.

When I am bathing in Rumi's words,
I am the birds, the sky, the trees;
I am everything.

Rumi understood that each of us is a house for God to live,
that the reality of love is the comfort, knowing, and peace
of home
"where we know what everyone really intends,
where we can walk around without clothes on."

I had no idea who Rumi was until today. One word inspiring. This doesn't even begin to describe how his words have affected me. When he speaks about human desire and how that desire drives us. How he can connect love with God and its not wrong.Being pregnant with God and comparing ourselves to breastfeeding mothers; just to be full of Jesus. These metaphores are so accurate, so clear, so warm. His words give me hope, they put me at ease. The hope is that words can convey this huge thoughts that we struggle to comprehend and then to write. Content to know my spiritual trek will not cease. It provides the drive I've been searching for to climb to the next level. This day I have found peace and meaning if only for a moment. I want to learn so much more about him.

I teach creative writing to men at The Suffolk County House of Correction in Boston. Last week, a student read a poem that deplored men's treatment of women. This sparked a discussion of highly disparate views on how women should be treated by men. The student who read the poem was Muslim, and another student also, Muslim, insisted that women should be subjugated to men and "walk behind them". Another student insisted that women were the root of evil based on the story of Adam and Eve; while yet another student, the only white man in the group of one Latino and five African-Americans, pointed out that the two men who felt women were not equals, were only advocating what their ancestors had suffered as slaves. The discussion was cordial and restrained throughout, and I will say that I, as a woman and their instructor have never been treated by any of these men with anything less than respect and gratitude. I remained objective, as should an instructor and facilitator, and kept the focus of the discussion on the student's poem. I also guided the class to determine what might be at the heart of suppression and prejudice, like fear. I have, however, continued to think about this discussion. I was impressed by the comportment of my students showed, and told them so, but I was admittedly alarmed by some of their views. My role, however, is not to impose my views upon them and preach. Today, listening to the show, Rumi's words, and the subsequent discussion, gave me something to bring to my students that can help them examine and broaden their spirituality and their perception of women, themselves, and life. "The Value of Perplexity", the idea of "collecting that scatteredness", his themes of "separation and longing" the idea that "to speak the same language is to share the same blood" And the idea that there is no "original sin, only forgetting". Many of my students see the world solely in terms of good and bad. Rumi's work - work, I am presently only peripherally familiar with -- directly addresses much of what my incarcerated students struggle with and write about in their own poetry and prose. His work will provide me a way to help them understand their own prejudices, and behavior, and feelings that come, I believe, from lives filled with violence and unmet material and spiritual need, lives lacking, to a great degree, in love and nurturing. His work will, I believe, inspire their own. Writing, and all artistic, creative expression is a way to find the love that exists within us undiminished, and give it to the world, despite what we've done to this world and what it has done to us. If my students discover that love, feel it only for a moment, they are better for it.

I would not describe myself as a "cryer". In fact, I'm a rather pragmatic philosopher and a self-proclaimed secularist. I first encountered Rumi at a yoga class my girlfriend strong-armed me into checking out. The class was a combination of challenging physical poses, breathing meditations and at it's weekly close, we would all lie on the floor in what is called aptly, the "dead body pose". Our instructor would run us through a series of deep breathing exercises, then read to us from Rumi. The first time I experienced this reading, I cried. From that day forward, I have kept a collection of Rumi's poems on my alter and after morning meditation, I open the book at random and read, trusting that Rumi's mystic wisdom will find me and provide prose that something within me will recognize. Frequently, I am moved to tears by what I have discovered. I find Rumi's poetry to reduce me to what I really am and to create an expansion in me, as well...this paradox is powerful medicine and inspires a moment of true humility in me that is much more difficult to identify with in my day-to-day ego-centric comings and goings.

Rumi is every bit as much a part of my daily spiritual practice as the practice itself. Thank you for doing some a beautiful piece on such a gift of a man!

Re On Being: The Ecstatic Poetry of Rumi What is arrayed here: a RAY ed. About Light itself in all its aspects. What is whirled, as in Sufi Masters, as in Rumi, is world itself, whirled, and these are whirrling words. To quote what was so beautifully said, by Fatemeh Keshavarz: the whirling brings it into your everyday life.. Everything in the universe is whirling with the force of love. We need to join the dance!" I say, whirled without end. And I say there is something so beyond beautiful about the poetry, the soul of Rumi, that transcends and transports us, directly, to the Divine in us all, and in all. Awe. Just say, AWE! The metaphoric connect between whirling and centering, as discussed by Keshavarz in her interview transcends the dance, and is the dance. The potter at the potter's wheel, is turning, turning, and as the vessel shapes, it is called an act of centering, truly a spiritual act, for the potter. I could also say, that the w ord pottery itself is so redolent of our word, poetry. The poetry of life is the love. It's how we live it. Rumi saw this deeply, and in few words, he expressed a multitude. It is a condensation of essence, so beautiful we do cry, as what tears at us, tears of sorrow, are also tears of joy. There is this profound amalgam in all of our lives, and we do perceive this everywhere, and on a soul level, very difficult to describe, paradoxically in words. But he does it. He does it. As does is also for young deer. So dear is this, it transcends us, and brings us to become, souls on fire! The song of the reed is the encapsulation of our lives, of our longing for merger, and of journey to and from the Divine, in our very lives and through the years these threads of story do connect to this story. The music. I am also deeply aware of Moses and how he was drawn from a basket of reeds, among reeds, and that story of Exodus and Arrival, but yes, we never fully arrive, and he did not, in h is life. It is so deeply a metaphoric journey for us all, with layers and layers of mirrors, the echoic connects, constantly with the ONE. With the very essence of LOVE itself. The deep fragrance and unfolding of the rose. The dawn, a rose, this morning, and with it I embraced the light, I stretched, and my arms reached beyond the stars and into a universe of myself, within, and, without. This story is about love.

When I was in college many years ago, the Minnesota poet Robert Bly had come in to make a reading of his Kabir Book of Rumi/Sufi translations; staying after class in the college library for a book signing.

I will never forget how Mr. Bly would look each student in the eye personally before proclaiming in writing above his signature a quote from his transations as-noted in the book. Each brief line was different for each student, yet perfect in placement...

The quote that I received was so fitting that I hired a commercial artist to create a graphic representation; which I then brought to my tattoo artist at the time, and had inked into my inner right forearm.

That quote still fits me all these years later; and the show on Rumi brought back memories that lead me to thought and feeling... So I thank you!

Rumi is my blood brother. I am a white bread American, Caucasian, family of Irish/German/English background. Really happy, really immersed (in everyday reality) expressions of experience did not come tripping out often on the lips of my family/teachers/friends. I was raised in the upper middle class of an mid-Atlantic East Coast metropolis, in the 50s and 60s. What college you went to, your religion or lack of, the part of town you were from...each was significant. How attractive you looked; how cool you acted. Rumi don't care. Rumi slices it wide open, like a halved and quartered watermelon in August, cooled in the spring, sweet, cold on a hot day, luscious, innocent, red, black, green. Rumi brings ecstasy to my address, on my doormat, rings the bell, leaves it to me. From hundreds of years ago, from thousands upon thousands of miles away, a world away from Maryland, USA, he brings ecstasy in being alive, places it in my hands, disappears; the wealth is enormous, what he gives, what you create for yourself at his word.

I am a Zen/Sufi in religion and a poet and a big fan of Rumi's; I especially enjoyed the "I am fire" line you read. One point: you brought up no politics?- which made me wonder- how would Rumi deal with an oppressive regime? Certainly Sufis have been bombed in Pakistan- and your own country appears to b run by fundamentalist idiots who would be torturing Rumi? No? And you don't mention that?

I am a Zen and a Sufi in my religious sensibilities- BUT I also identify with the revolutionary Christ. I find Speaking of Faith to be sorely lacking in the prophetic tradition- in other words -it always seems to be, "Don't rock the boat". Rumi would not approve.

I have read philosophy and studied maditation for many years. I have enjoyed some degree of success in meditation as far as I know that to be. When I started reading Rumi he transformed my way of looking. His words have made it easier and faster for me to enter a state which I love but am unable to discribe. I am hoping I'm on the edge of enlightenment, but can't maintain that status long enough to use the state in my daily activity. Having said that, Rumi says, "those who know don't speak, and those who speak don't know." I do know the state and the transition or shift are near impossible to explain. It's said no one can tell you how to meditate but they try to point the way or the direction. What they are doing is trying to say how they reach this condition. Meditation is a personal thing to me despite all the formal methods. It's only been with Rumi that I have made this shift faster and easier than all of the other methods. I've experimented many ways over thirty years.Rumi's way is not a method, its a state. You are attempting to enter a mind position of no thinking or just being...or what I might call 'isness', or a moving in the "Now." It's easier to do this with certain thoughts that blot your normal cerebral path. In this way you "see" but are not thinking. It's a form of understanding but not trying to figure things our or judge them. You move and see and then feel "all of this was before words." I have found my best meditations occured when I was walking in nature away from man made sights and sounds. Often I would move into a state of consentrated staring which I called a shift in mind. Carlos Castenada four books talk about making a mental shift and I never really knew what he meant until I used Rumi's words while walking. The shift was near instant. One line I've found pleasurable success with is, "When you are with everyone, but not with me, you are with no one, and when you are with no one and you are with me, you are with Everyone." This concept fills me with a sense of joy and all of my "seeing" is with what Ralph Waldo Emerson might call the "inner eye." Emerson is great, but Rumi is pure magic.

Rumi's poetry inspired me to write poetry. I remember exactly where and when that happened. I was listening to Coleman Barks read Who Says Words With My Mouth. I was in my car while driving. I immediately pulled the car over and grabbed a piece of paper and wrote a poem. I have been writing ever since. To me, his poetry inspires the artist in us all.

Rumi paints a beautiful picture of what life can be when it is lived in service of Love, and also showed me that when human love is seen in the context of Divine Love, then there really is no difference.

Rumi also served for me as a gateway to living practices based on the ancient wisdom tradition of Sufism. As Rumi made clear, words are never enough, even his inspired words. If you are inspired by Rumi's words, I recommend that you seek out communities that support you as you travel the Path of Love. For a very readable, experiential introduction, check out Pir Vilayat Inayat Khan's book "Awakening." But ultimately, don't focus on books; seek out other human hearts that do Sufi practices. Here are a few such communities:
- Sufi Order International (sufiorder.org)
- Golden Sufi Center (goldensufi.org)
- Sufi Ruhaniat International (ruhaniat.org)
- The Threshhold Society (sufism.org)

As Rumi said:

Come, come, whoever you are,
This caravan has no despair
Even though you have broken your vows
Perhaps ten thousand times

Wanderer, worshiper, lover of leaving,
Come

Rumi has taught me how to listen. I don't remember my first exposure to his writing. I do remember a time when I was living in Oklahoma and had become overwhelmed with my own high demands for perfection. Going full speed ahead into emotional bankruptcy, never giving myself a break, fearful to the point of paralysis that I would fail in my new career teaching, my work as a writer, and in my contributions to the Benedictine community where I lived. One morning, my dear friend handed me a small sheet of stationery with pastel flowered border. She had written out Rumi's "Today, like every other day, we wake up empty and frightened. Don't open the door to the study and begin reading. Take down a musical instrument. Let the beauty we love be what we do...who we are. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground." She signed it with Rumi's name as well as her own since she had added "who we are." Maya Angelou says that "love liberates." Rumi gently brings us back to our true selves. Rumi's power is in his deep connective love for human beings in their struggle to be and do what is their passionate calling. I have that little note still (after moving three times since being given this gift ten or twelve years ago) taped above my desk in my home study.

On my walk today I listened to the podcast about Rumi, the Iranian Suni poet who writes of love, relationship, the world and God. Many times during my walk I was moved – sometimes to laughter, sometimes an “ah ha”, sometimes near tears and with sadness. I found his poetry and his story to be so moving, and wondered how someone who was that gifted and who gave so to much to others, lived. What sense of self does one have, being so filled and present to God? Is it having God as self – to be united and so combined that one doesn’t know anything else except self as God and God as self? Listening, I felt deep emotion, moved to tears. The emotion welled up inside me. As I listened to the podcast, Krista Tippett, the scholar she was interviewing and to the poetry of Rumi, I found myself thinking about how I long to write, and wondered if there might be a poet inside of me? I wondered how I could begin to write, and if others would ever want to read what I wrote. And then I felt inspired. The idea came to write a Lenten Reflection Journal. Having just begun the season of Lent (I am Episcopalian), I longed for a practice that would bring me closer to God. Clearly, I felt the call to sit down and document my experiences over Lent – just one girl’s Lenten journey. It wouldn’t be liturgical or the type of writing that just led one to scripture or classically formulated prayers as I often find in the Episcopal church. My writing would incorporate all different aspects of spirituality offered through many traditions, from many thought leaders and the impact and impressions they made upon me. And so I have begun. As I continued to walk and listen, I had the moment (THE moment) when I realized that my spirituality scares me to death. I am so afraid of being as spiritual as I know myself to truly be. Does that make sense? What I mean is that when I experience other traditions, and listen to or read of others’ spiritual journeys; I find alignment, and understanding, and I am intrigued. I say, “Yes, that speaks to me.” “Yes, I would like to feel that free.” – And sometimes, I say, "No, I disagree". And at once it is invigorating and frightening. That is what happened when I listened to the story of Rumi, and the Whirling Dirvishes – the Suni dancers who whirl around in circles, singing, or chanting, to be closer to God. Intentional dancing in a circle that allows one to be centered while still moving. This is the challenge I face in my everyday life. Moving in many directions at once, fast and furious, I often lose sense of my center. I lose my grounding. It is the why of what I am and do, and when the distractions in my life are such that I cannot find my center, I am lost. As I listened to the discussion, I imagined myself dancing freely in a circle – head focused up to the heavens, with my heart and eyes upon God and without a care in the world, except showing the joy for living the life God has given me. It made me smile. I’m sure in my walking (with my headset on) that I began to move a little to the left and right, kind of a walking dance. Of course, I never cut loose and went in circles lest I be seen by someone on the street and be committed! – Seriously though, I asked myself, what would it take for me to let go and be free enough to dance passionately with focus upon God? How trapped in my body and life am I, that I cannot do this? I love the beauty and symbolism in the Dirvish dance. Recalling that one hand is pointed up toward the heavens, and the other down, symbolizing a joining of heaven and earth – and of being at the center of it, I am moved. Rumi often speaks of a wholeness of being – of being one with spirit, and yet apart from spirit. Love is his mantra – and although it sounded like his poems were written to a “lover” – the understanding is that this is our entry point into the poem, and once in, we can find our way to a love that surpasses all understanding – the love of God. Who is, by the way, the ultimate lover.

Dear Laurel, i read your message about Jalaludin Mohammad Balkhi Rumi, i just want to say that this Guy is Not Iranian, He was in born on 1207 in "Balkh " which is in In my homeland Afghanistan as you Know in past 40 years war in my country we lost each and everything even our neighbors wants to stool our History, iam really Captive of Balkhi`s Poems, and he is the one who has Explained the sense of each and everyone, what ever you have in your Heart and don`t have words to say, you can find it in Rumi`s poems.
regards
Ahmad

Rumi took me to the World beneath the flesh. His every word sends fireworks off in my soul. I understand his depth like an inkling I had never yet put words to. He knows Love of the Flesh is Divine, and celebrates this human existence as much as existence beyond flesh.
After reading Rumi for a couple of years, I encountered Divine Love through a human being. It was a brief encounter filled with intensity and truth, then separation. In that moment of vulnerable heartbreak I snapped into deeper understanding of what Rumi was saying all his life. What happened to him when he met Shams.
Words cascaded into me in a flurry of clarity. I wrote:

In our oneness
I cannot exclude You
in anything I do.

He is like Rummi's word
Shams
in the books
Where he talks about Sun.
If you stimulate me constantly,
for the rest of my Life,
on my spiritual journey.
You will be always with me.

Now I want to taste every flavour, every richness
In life
Because
I know
none of it
is mine to hold.
Only mine to behold.
And in that knowledge,
I am safe.

So, Fear...
my dear.
Is my friend.
My greatest friend
Showing
me the doorway
to Love.

I felt a oneness with Rumi, and a connection to the place from which words flowed into him. I understood the surrendering necessary to experience this generosity.
When I cannot open myself to Rumi, I know I am not open to myself.

First ever Rumi was like being silent and still and letting it all bleed into the universe, Rumi is a mover of mountains like no other I have known. I am happy when Rumi speaks. I dance within for I know his song

Since introduced to Rumi over a year ago, I find that he gives flight to my spirit that stirs and almost bursts within me of the love I have for God, nature and mankind. He gives voice to my heart- a heart that has been waiting to love another so richly, passionately and purely. And, I take comfort in knowing that this love can only but grow. When I read Rumi's poems, I feel as though God has remembered me, that He has given me a special gift to love and appreciate Him and the nature that He has created with such glory. I respond with gratitude to Rumi's writings, for I feel as though I am not alone in my surging love for creation that often brings me to tears of joy.

Thank you featuring Rumi on your show. It has made me appreciate him even more.

Greetings, thank you for this talk. I was part of an Americanized Sufi group for many years, trained as a "whirling dervish"- but till I embraced Islam in 1999 I was not able to appreciate Rumi's message in the way I do now.
I was relieved to hear Krista speak about the importance of being grounded in a tradition-that "making something universal does not always apply.
Rumi said:
"I am the slave of the Koran
While I still have life.
I am on the path of Muhammad,
The Chosen One.
If anyone interprets my words
In any other way,
I deplore that person,
And I deplore his words.

The most"beautfiul whirling" I experienced was on hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca, with Muslims going round and round, never stopping 7 days a week, 24 hours a day, every month, every year for centuries.

IF RUMI WAS BUDDHIST; ZEN, A JEW; KABBALIST, CHRISTIAN; GNOSTIC. SO MUCH OF RUMI SPOKE TO ME DIRECTLY; I AM FAMILIAR WITH THE EKSTASIS OF KNOWING GOD BUT TO GIVE IT A HUMAN DIMENSION AS ONE LOVES ANOTHER GIVES ME NEW INSIGHT INTO THE BRAHMIN. EXTREMELY BEAUTIFUL, ENLIGHTENING AND SATISFYING SHOW THANK YOU.

I wonder what Rumi would have to say to the current rulers of Iran.

In terms of exuberance for life, love,and art, Rumi is closer to modern Israelis that I have known.

I first encountered Rumi's poetry when I became part of a Courage to Teach group (based on the work of Quaker educator and author Parker Palmer) at the Fetzer Institute in Kalamazoo, Michigan. I was entranced by so many different poems that we used over the course of that group, but most of all by this one, as translated by Coleman Barks:

Today, like every other day, we wake up empty
and frightened. Don't open the door to the study
and begin reading. Take down a musical instrument.
Let the beauty we love be what we do.
There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.

As someone who has experienced depression periodically throughout my life, and who often turned to reading as a "safe" option for dealing with many uncomfortable experiences, this wisdom has made a transformative difference to me. When I do wake up empty and frightened, I now turn to drumming or rattling. I move, I sing. I was recently able to move to a lake, and I go outside and hear the geese or watch the swans.

Since encountering Rumi, I have felt a strong pull toward visiting where he lived and die. I had a dream that a group I was part of and was planning a trip to India would also go to Konya, Turkey and visit Rumi's tomb. I ended up being in charge of planning that part of the trip - a stop in Turkey - in 2011. In late February, with our Sufi guides, we turned down the street that ended at Mevlana's tomb. I began to cry. I felt that I was finally experiencing a connection to someone that I had not even known I was longing for. As we slowly moved through the building with other pilgrims, I was overwhelmed with tears. My grief, my longing - was exactly as Rumi so often describes. Now that I was experiencing union with Mevlana, I was able to realize how I had missed this connection before that day. We were also able to speak with a Sufi master who lives adjacent to Rumi's tomb, the master of one of the people who helped us plan our stay in Konya. His joy and centeredness and the bliss he radiated, especially in his relationship with his daughter, was our joy as well as we interacted with him. We saw a sema (whirling dervish ceremony) in Istanbul that was marvelous. The devotion of the semazen was so poignant.

There is an experience in connecting with Rumi. The joy, the longing, the dancing, the tears, the aliveness that I have experienced has brought a richness and connection in my life and a depth of spiritual experience that little else has. I can't really explain why a middle-aged Caucasian woman from the Midwest who is a teacher educator and therapist developed a relationship with a 13th century Sufi mystic. But I am grateful, and joyful. I also express my gratitude to Coleman Barks, and the wonderful video of Bill Moyers' interview with him in the Language of Love series, for opening Rumi's words to me and many others who might not have known them otherwise.

Very different than usual discussions on Rumi which focuses on American Poets who write Rumi translations without knowing Persian (using other translations).

on a different note:

Rumi's poetry is used for lyrics in Afghan Music for long time. Here's a song by Afghan Popular singer singing "Listen to Reed".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIaeUOtbpyY&feature=related

Enjoy.

Context. It was nice to hear more about Rumi's life and his influence within and across cultures over the centuries. I just recently discovered his work, and have greatly savored a single poem a day this year, using Coleman Bark's A Year with Rumi. He has been a good traveling companion during a period of transition in which I have found people who speak my language few and far between. How amazing it is to me that the language of the soul again and again crosses the barriers thrown up by time, culture, religion, and gender. Rumi is a perfect example of this. Finding him was a great gift. Much needed. Much appreciated.

Rumi took me to the World beneath the flesh. His every word sends fireworks off in my soul. I understand his depth like an inkling I had never yet put words to. He knows Love of the Flesh is Divine, and celebrates this human existence as much as existence beyond flesh.
After reading Rumi for a couple of years, I encountered Divine Love through a human being. It was a brief encounter filled with intensity and truth, then separation. In that moment of vulnerable heartbreak I snapped into deeper understanding of what Rumi was saying all his life. What happened to him when he met Shams.
Words cascaded into me in a flurry of clarity. I wrote:

In our oneness
I cannot exclude You
in anything I do.

He is like Rummi's word
Shams
in the books
Where he talks about Sun.
If you stimulate me constantly,
for the rest of my Life,
on my spiritual journey.
You will be always with me.

Now I want to taste every flavour, every richness
In life
Because
I know
none of it
is mine to hold.
Only mine to behold.
And in that knowledge,
I am safe.

So, Fear...
my dear.
Is my friend.
My greatest friend
Showing
me the doorway
to Love.

I felt a oneness with Rumi, and a connection to the place from which words flowed into him. I understood the surrendering necessary to experience this generosity.
When I cannot open myself to Rumi, I know I am not open to myself.

First ever Rumi was like being silent and still and letting it all bleed into the universe, Rumi is a mover of mountains like no other I have known. I am happy when Rumi speaks. I dance within for I know his song

My heart resounds to every word of Rumi..he reaches the depths of Sufism...and diving in with him to the realities of the truth of unconditional love..brings such bliss everytime...
My dream is to visit his Tomb in Konya on his death anniversary which falls on my Birth date and be in the spiritual journey to the deep learning's of his poetry ..unraveling the mystical divinity that lies within each core of his writing and its essence ...
I feel blessed to be able to know about him and enjoy his writing in this life..~

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